The truth about the American military plane crashed in Afghanistan on Monday 27 January 2020 will probably remain forever shrouded in mystery. The Pentagon has finally released an official statement confirming the names of the two aviators whose bodies the US military has recovered with the consent of the Taliban but adds very few other certainties.

It didn’t confirm, nor did it deny, the hypothesis that on the Bombardier / Northrop Grumman E-11A there were CIA agents as supported by the Afghan mujaheddin, the first to intervene on the spot, and that among them there was also the commander for operations in the Middle East Michael D’Andrea who would have died. But an indirect confirmation of the role of the Central Intelligence Agency comes from the role of the deceased pilot …

Lt. Col. Paul Voss, left, and Capt. Ryan Phaneuf was killed Jan. 27 in the crash of their E-11A battlefield communications aircraft in Ghazni province, Afghanistan. (Voss photo via Air Combat Command; Phaneuf photo via Alvirne High School yearbook, courtesy of David Morin)

CNN reported a Department Defense’s statement in which it confirmed that in the plane crash in Afghanistan’s Ghazni province died  Lt. Col. Paul Voss, 46, of Yigo, Guam, served at Headquarters Air Combat Command at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, and Capt. Ryan Phaneuf, 30, of Hudson, New Hampshire, served on the 37th Bomb Squadron at Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota, the Pentagon said in a statement.

The Pentagon added that the men had been supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel, the military’s official designation for the US mission in Afghanistan. The E-11A is used to link troops in the field to headquarters and has been previously described by Air Force pilots as “WiFi in the sky.”

The US military said Tuesday that two bodies had been recovered from the crash by US forces, adding that sensitive equipment also had been disabled by military personnel who arrived at the site. A defense official had previously told CNN there was an indication that the crew had made a distress call, a sign of some type of trouble with the aircraft, prior to its crashing. A spokesperson for US forces in Afghanistan said Monday that there was “no indication” the plane had been downed by enemy fire reads on CNN post.

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